Posts Tagged ‘inspiration’

10 goals in 10 months – #fitbitch10in10

March 1, 2019 at 2:28
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Setting a goal is proven to help keep you motivated. And what’s more inspiring  than training for something that will leave you with a great sense of achievement, compared to trying to motivate yourself to hit a number on scale? (pssst. that will happen anyway without you thinking about it with #fitbitch10in10)

Join our tenth year anniversary celebrations by participating in #fitbitch10in10, setting 10 goals that you can work towards during 2019 to complete a life inspiring year of fitness and healthy change!

Set goals and be part of something!

Saturday 30th March, 8.15am, Box Beach Box Sauna, £23.75 plus admin fee

A 30 minute high intensity beachfront boxing session followed by a sauna at Beach Box Brighton , including a salt scrub, followed by an invigorating sea dip!

Thursday April 18th, Bluebell Stanmer Trail Explore, 7pm, £10 plus admin fee

Join us for a bluebell run through Stanmer Woods, Thursday 28th for all levels, or if you’ve got an entry, do the Raw Energy BlueBell Angmering 10 or 10 miles or BM10k. If you join us for the explore, it will be a walk run, dog jog whatever works. The main focus is seeing the amazing carpet of bluebells!

May 5th,  Steyning Super Sprint Triathlon, 7.40am, £52, 10% discount with our event partners

**Fitbitch Tri Training Day April 27th, with a King Alfred swim, followed by bike and park run – do them all, or team up with your relay team. £15 plus admin fee, taken by two times Ironwoman, Amy.***

The Sprint distance comprises of a 400m pool swim, 20k bike and a 5k run easily achievable on minimal training simply for the experience of doing it.

The swim is in a 25m indoor pool, you can do the bike on any bike that you have and the run will be a loop around the historic market town and into the grounds of Wilton House. Enter here  (although we have a discount code if you have a membership card).

To train for this, you will need a bike. The swim is in the pool. OR you can team up with two others to take part in a team relay and choose the discipline that works for you.

Fitbitch Tri training plan involving 3-4 sessions per week (we’ll tell you the key ones if you have limited time) £30 plus admin fee. You will need to start training mid March.

Friday June 14, MTB and Sleep Out, from 7pm, £25 plus admin fee

You will need a MTB and a sleeping bag as a minimum for this urban adventure. We’ll meet at Stanmer Park and cycle out for a max 10 mile ride to our secret sleep out location. You’ll need to bring your own food for dinner but we’ll watch the sunrise with a cup of tea before cycling back to Stanmer for breakfast.  Limited to 6 people.

Wednesday June 19th, Swim the Lake, 7pm, £19 + £4 triathlon day licence

If you have never done open water swimming, you’ll think it’s terrifying. Thoughts of Jaws come to mind. But honestly, once you do it you’ll wonder why you’ve never done it before and you’ll never want to go back to a swimming pool again … except in the winter perhaps!

You will need a wetsuit.  It’s only 750metres. Enter here

We will have some discounted group training for this in conjunction with Brighton Sealanes. 

Brighton Sea Lanes also offer 10% discount for single one-to-one lessons to those who have a Fitbitch membership card.

Tuesday July 23rd, Sun Up Yoga and Sea Dip, 7am, £15 plus admin fee

Join us on the seafront just before the school holidays begin for a beautiful restoring, life affirming 45 minute yoga class before a swim in the sea to set you off fantastically for the day ahead.

August, SunRise Yoga Stand Up Paddle Boarding, 6.15am price TBC, Hove Lagoon

Get up, get out and watch the beauty of the sun rise as you flex and stretch on this beach front yoga session before joining us to try out stand up paddle boarding, or just swim!

Sunday September 29th Barns Green 10k, 10.20am, £20

The beauty of the Sussex countryside in late summer is not to be missed. And this event showcases it in all its glory, ending with  live music – and it being Fitbitch, we’ll find a pub! You will need to follow an 8-10 week training plan of 2-3 sessions per week (as a beginner). The plan will start July 22. It will cost £20 plus admin fee. Enter here 

Saturday October 10th, Beach Box Belles, 8.15am, £23.75 plus admin fee

A 30 minute high intensity beachfront boxing session followed by a sauna at Beach Box Brighton and an invigorating sea dip!

 Saturday November 23rd, Hove Park parkrun 9am FREE

Join us for a get together at Hove Park parkrun, the home of many Fitbitches running their first ever 5k in the last ten years. Breakfast at Three Stack pancakes after!

Sunday December 8th, Mince Pie 10 miles (start time TBC)

Walk it, jog it, run walk it, this beautiful 10 mile trail run is hilly but you can do it in fancy dress with friends and your reward? Other than the endorphins and feel good achievement, an ENTIRE SPORTS HALL full of mince pies!

Enter here (entries not open yet)

 

Take part in #fitbitchb10in10 to help inspire and motivate others by posting on IG or Twitter using the #fitbitch10in10.

We are now offering Fitbitch membership cards which cost £20 for the year (plus P&P), which entitles you to 10% off our curated events plus 10 % discount with selected local partners and event partners.

 

 



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How to stay motivated to create the biggest mind & body shift


Posted by Rachael Woolston

What to know the simplest way to stay motivated to exercising and healthy living? Statistics from Strava reveal that it’s something far easier than you might think…

At the beginning of every year, Strava, the biggest tracking platform for runners and cyclists in the world, crunch all their data to reveal big insights into everything from the most popular running distance for women (half marathon) to the female age group that runs the furthest and fastest (women aged 42-49, so who says getting older means slowing down?).

But what we were most interested to see, was the extent to which setting a goal encourages adherence to exercise with 89% of those who set a running goal for instance, still sticking to running up to six months later.

So, if you always find sticking to exercise a bit of a drag, then the answer could be as simple as finding a goal that inspires you – and perhaps scares you a little – to keep you motivated.

It’s why we always work with each and every customer who comes to us to help them set a goal that challenges but inspires them, whether it’s to be able to do ten full push ups by the end of a four weeks course (and yes, many come not being able to do one on their knees so it’s possible), run their first 5k Parkrun, complete an obstacle race or on their first adventure race.

You don’t need to be an athlete or aspire to be one to have a goal, you just have to recognise that you want to change something and be inspired to try.

That’s why for the Fitbitch tenth anniversary, we are launching  #fitbitch10in10, providing 10 goals that you can take on over the next ten months to inspire you to get fit and build your confidence while training with a group of like minded women.

You can train with us virtually or join us in some group sessions. There is no limit on age and all fitness backgrounds are welcome.

We have a track record in helping women who are total fitness newbies take on some big ‘firsts’ from park runs to triathlons, cycle rides to Tough Mudder Obstacles.

 

Our four week courses are the absolute foundations upon which you can build the stamina, fitness and belief to take on any of these challenges,  along with a committed group of other Fitbitches.

It may seem impossible to you if you’re reading this now, but nothing is impossible when you set a goal and work, one step at a time, to reach that goal. Click here for details of #fitbitch10in10.

Our Awaken starts on Monday, aimed at awakening all your senses to the joy of exercising outdoors, and a holistic approach to fitness, incorporating everything from meditation to myofascial mobility work, kickboxing to kettlebells, Barre work to boxing.

 



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Cycling from Land’s End to John O’Groats

April 4, 2018 at 5:02
Posted by Rachael Woolston

It’s a famous rite of passage for any cyclist and adventure queen, riding from Lands End to John O’Groats. Here, Ingrid Kane details her incredible experience of riding  969 miles over nine days as part of Deloitte Ride Across Britain 2017 and proves that no matter how busy you are, it is possible to train if you train smart…

How it works

A couple of years ago I thought I would like a new challenge and cycling the length of the UK had always been on my bucket list. However, I struggled to work out how I would fit the event and training in with a busy job. Deloitte Ride Across Britain (RAB)  seemed to fit the bill perfectly.

The challenge: cycling 969 miles over 9 days

Logistics: luggage limited to 15kg, transferred from camp to camp by organisers

Accommodation: tents (no you don’t have to put them up and down, a kind team do that for you!). In 2017 there was a hotel option – none of that for me!

What you need to know: it’s a tough challenge, but you can do it with some preparation. Be prepared for all weathers – 2017 was the wettest (and muddiest) RAB to date.

What you need: a road bike – doesn’t need to be anything too fancy although you may well get bike envy once you start the ride!

The training

I entered RAB about a year before the start, catching the early bird entry fee and persuaded one of my crazy friends to join me. The organisers provide a detailed training programme, but I knew that with my work and busy life, I was not going to be able to fit in lots of cycling before the event or in the winter months, and so I decided to adapt my training and fit in multiple activities.

Coaches, Rachael, Amy at the Fitbitch camps in Lewes gave me the perfect kick start, and I also did weekly Pilates classes and started running, first within the bootcamp sessions and then with Girls Run the World. I even started back to hockey sessions to build my fitness! Cycling wise, I used  several sportives to help me build up the distances and once Spring arrived, I began cycling 10 hilly miles two and from work twice a week, which was invaluable. .

I work one in three weekends and so fitting long training rides in at the weekend was tricky but I did what I could, completing the fantastic Elfstedentocht cycle tour event in the Netherlands, the Dunwich Dynamo (cycling from London to Suffolk overnight) and the Ride 100 in London. By the time the start approached I had lost weight, felt much fitter and was looking forward to the event …but I was still VERY worried about my ability to cycle nine consecutive days of over 100 miles. Mental attitude is key, but I felt I had an advantage in being used to working longs hours on limited sleep!

The Start

Crossing the start line on a windy day in Lands End was amazing; suddenly all my anxieties disappeared as I started cycling with  approximately 700 people from all walks of life but it was a tough day – who knew Cornwall and Devon were so hilly?! We climbed over 6000 feet on that first day and boy did I sleep well. By the time I’d completed day two, I felt strong and confident that I’d complete the event, barring any accidents.  Mentally, I knew I would have to dig deep at times – most notably leaving Bath in  in torrential rain with water coming up out of drains and flowing uphill!

 

The Finish

Crossing the finish line was incredibly emotional, and I felt an unbelievable sense of achievement, but it was also rather sad. After nine days spent experiencing such highs and lows with people I met along the way,  so many people had to rush off to catch trains and planes. I’d definitely recommend arranging a hotel near the finish like I did so you get the opportunity to explore Orkney and let it all sink in. I ended up catching up with a friend I’d cycled with in Israel over 25 years previously. It was an amazing experience and I’d do it again like a shot!

The Highs

Experiencing the incredible country we live in on two wheels.

Making it 969 miles without walking any of the route.

The summit of Shap.

Completing the 126 miles from Hamilton to Fort William through spectacular Glen Coe

Meeting some inspiring people

Lulu’s food in camp

Camping, even in the mud!

Surviving with no mechanical issues and no punctures – still can’t quite believe that!

The Lows

Damp clothes, even after a night in the ‘drying’ room.

A couple of 4.30am starts.

The queue for the coffee van at pit stops!

What everyone always wants to know.

The Nitty Gritty

Food: the event is fully catered and the food was better than I could have imagined, with al dietary requirements are catered for. Lulu and her staff manage to provide food for around 900 (including all the logistics team) everyday from breakfast (porridge and fruit to a full English) to a choice of four main courses for supper. The bonus of an event like this is that you can eat as much as you like! During the day there are at least two pit stops – again plenty of food. Pork pies and Muller rice seemed particular favourites!

Facilities: a hot shower is available everyday courtesy of posh wash showers, along with toilets

Medical support: available at camp and en route each day, and every third night, you are allocate a physio session

Broom wagon: there is a cut off of about 12 hours each day. A bus picks up anyone who is struggling, with medical issues or drastic mechanical issues that the mechanics are unable to fix on the road.

 

If you would like to read more about Ingrid’s experience, you can read her blog here. She raised £3000 for the Stroke Association and Karuna

In July 2018, another Fitbitch is undertaking LEJOG, this time unaided and unsupported. If you’d like to join her on some of it, or simply come and do some of the training rides, join our free Fitbitch ride community here.

 

 

 



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GRTW Get Together Race, Maverick Original Sussex

February 24, 2018 at 7:30
Posted by Rachael Woolston

To help inspire and bring the women of GRTW from the UK together, we’ve created a series of get together events some with our race partners who have provided exclusive discounts to GRTW community.

This is one of them, a beautiful off-road run in West Sussex offering a variety of distances to suit everyone. if you want to read about the maverick races, you can read our blog about their Kent race, form one of our runners, Sarah Crosier. http://girlsruntheworld.co.uk/2017/10/13/race-review-the-maverick-inov-8-original-kent/.

We will meet at the race for a warm up and the post run celebration. Wear your GRTW t-shirts to help identify yourself.

For the 15% discount, you must be subscribed to our community which you can do via our website. There is a team Girls Run the World on the entry when you enter so search for us as a team.



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The National Running Show, 20-21 January 2018

January 12, 2018 at 1:01
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Want to hear from some of the most inspirational female runners in the UK today? Do you want to find out all the latest kit info? Then you need to get yourself to the first National Running Show at the Birmingham’s NEC

If you want to hear first hand from some of the UK’s most inspirational runners, then the first national running show expo is the place to be. It will be featuring a whole host of runners, including  Jo Pavey, Dame Kelly Holmes and the amazing ultra running mum, Susie Chan, who has completed the Marathon des Sables three times, and tackled running through a jungle for 5 days self-sufficient.

Plus, you’ll get the opportunity to have your gait analysed, which really helps you to see where you have biomechanical issues that strength and conditioning, flexibility and a different training shoe could improve. Plus, chat nutrition with the brilliant Anita Bean and visit the Nutrition Advice Zone, who will be offering valuable advice on what you should be eating and drinking as a runner.

And if that’s not enough, there will be plenty of running products and clothing to browse and purchase, with the likes of everyone from Vibram to Hoka One One and Saucony at the expo.

Tickets cost just £10. For more information and booking visit the event website.



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The Diary of a Running Mum: Get Your Brave On

September 5, 2016 at 6:29
Posted by Rachael Woolston

If you struggle with the fear of taking on fitness challenges or gambles in life in general, our running mum diarist, Tanya Taylor, 43, has some words of advice..

IMG_8928

Eighteen years ago, back when I was a carefree 25 year old, living in a cool rented flat in the centre of town, with a handsome boyfriend and a part time job, my sister died. She died quite suddenly, and in tragic circumstances, leaving behind two young children. My sister, Sacha, had only just turned 30, and her death changed me as a person overnight.

Shortly after she died, I can remember looking in the bathroom mirror and not recognising the face that looked back at me. The weeks of crying and not eating had obviously affected my physical features, but it was more than that, I was different, something deep within me had altered.

The year that followed was full of change. I somehow managed to finish my degree, we moved to a flat by the sea, I married my handsome boyfriend (he proof-reads these…) and we had a baby. I no longer wanted to put things off, I was so deeply affected by the sense that life was so fleeting.

Our wedding had been planned and executed in 5 weeks – me in a £60 sundress and my husband in the first suit he had ever had to buy. I cried on the morning and evening of our wedding, my sister, Sacha’s absence was so overwhelming. Our baby was born several months later at home, the rain heavy outside -“You’re so brave to have a home birth with a first baby”, the midwife had exclaimed- but I knew, nothing would hurt or be as terrifying as losing a sister.

IMG_8927

Many years have passed, but that sense of mortality is still very much part of me. I believe in saying ‘Yes’, more than saying ‘No’ – I want to live a full life, to have adventures and experiences that my sister was  robbed of at such a young age. I owe it to her.

So it comes as no surprise, that when there are races or trips planned, I am usually one of the first to put my name down. Am I brave? No, I am naturally cautious and quite fearful, so it takes a lot for me to ‘get my brave on’, and so I still have to use little techniques to help me get my brave on.

My tips to help you feel more warrior than wimp

  1. Get a squad. At Fitbitch, we are so lucky to have so many inspiring women in our running community. Every woman empowers the next. Having someone to enter a race with or try a new running distance or route alongside can really makes a difference to your bravery levels. I wouldn’t have entered or completed Coast to Coast (106 miles across Scotland by MTB, Kayak and foot) if my race buddy J hadn’t been by my side the whole way.IMG_8923
  2. Create your own Talismans. I started using jewellery as a Talisman when I ran my first half marathon, like having a lucky charm. I use a handmade gold bracelet that was given to me on my 40th Birthday by a close group of friends, a gold necklace and my wedding ring. I also carry things my children have made me when I travel. It sounds corny, but it really helps to make me feel protected and strong.
  3. Train. It sounds obvious, but with a big race, if you are physically prepared, you feel more confident. Use a running club so you can train for races together or use a training plan downloaded from the many on offer on the Internet. (Fitbitch running courses start this week and our London club launches at the end of September. Join our London Facebook page for more details).
  4. Positive affirmations. Nike and Lululemon have positive mantras hidden into the seams of some of their sports items. I also love this banner by Secret Holiday – http://shop.secretholidayco.com/product/be-brave-affirmation-banner – which will definitely keep you feeling inspired. When I ran London Marathon this year, I copied out a text message from my friend J and had it in my back pocket the whole way. Her text told me I was strong, I was ready and to believe in myself. Just knowing those words were with me helped me so much mentally.
  5. Don’t overthink. Whenever I feel hesitant, whether it’s holding the cursor over a race entry confirmation or hovering at the top of a steep single track path on my mountain bike, I just take a deep breath and say to myself ‘Just fu*king do it’. It is amazing how effective this is – try it!
  6. Look for positives. Two years ago, I took on the challenge of swimming from Brighton Marina to Brighton Pier. I got separated from my group quite early, swimming out much deeper than the others. The currents were not in our favour that day, and the swim took twice as long as we had anticipated. My legs were cramping, and I was starting to imagine there were sharks swimming underneath (I know!!!!). I then looked up, and saw the sun setting just behind the Pier, it was shining right at me. I saw this as a sign that I was going to be okay, and not be eaten by a Great White off Brighton Beach.
  7. Cherish the Challenge. Some of the best experiences are when you are pushed outside your comfort zone. Swimming into a mountain lake with ice around the edges, is still one of the biggest natural highs I have ever experienced. I only thought about the possibilities of hyperthermia afterwards
  8. Less is more, sometimes. I try not to read too many details about the more challenging races I take on before the event. If I had known the last 14 miles of the Coast to Coast race involved running up and down two midge infested mountains (YES ,TWO MIDGE INFESTED MOUNTAINS,) there is a good chance I would have talked myself out of entering. Without wanting to appear sexist, a lot of the amateur race reviews (and worse still, the Go-Pro YouTube videos) are put on the Internet by men. They are pumped up with over-zealous, macho hype and I’m sure that helps a certain type of person (those that wear Ironman Finisher T’s to run local 5k races maybe?) but the reality is, with the correct training, most things are possible. Trust me, when you’re in the race and you’re in the zone, what might have looked terrifying and impossible online, is totally achievable.IMG_8921-2
  9. Products sometimes help. I use Aromatherapy Associates Miniature Bath & Shower oils (available from Liberty’s ) to rub on my pulses. The blends have names like ‘inner strength’ and ‘support breath’, and are completely addictive. They are tiny bottles and great for travel. I also have 5 Elements Acupuncture before any big races where I am treated for my anxiety levels.
  10. Fake it. If you are still feeling very nervous, fake it. Add a bit of swagger to your walk, smile at your fellow competitors and give them a friendly wink. Focus on calming breaths and your posture – shoulders back, stand tall. I can guarantee, there will be someone else there feeling more scared than you who won’t have read my blog!

I know if my brilliant sister was still here, she’d be the one screaming my name as I run over the finish lines. Her courage in her final weeks was mammoth compared to any courage I’ve ever had to muster up, and I will always be very proud of her, and so thankful to have had her in my life.

Tanya is one of our amazing Running Angel ambassadors who help to keep you company and motivated on our weekly Tuesday members runs. Membership costs just £25 including a race vest Tues evening runs except school holidays. Plus 10% off our season passes.

Year to Date Running Stats

Miles – 933

Elevation Gain 50,581 ft

Tanya’s Top Tracks for getting your brave on

‘Stronger’ – Kanye West

‘Tusk’ – Fleetwood Mac

‘Shake it Off’ – Taylor Swift

‘Fire’ – Kasabian

‘Born to Run’ – Bruce Springsteen



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The Diary of a Running Mum: A Case of the Bad Runs

July 8, 2016 at 4:05
Posted by Rachael Woolston

At the beginning of 2016, Tanya Taylor, 43 and mum of four took up the challenge to run every day of 2016 as part of the Fitbitch Challenge Community. This month, she finally reached the half way point…

Three minute post shower lie down as running reward

Three minute post shower lie down as running reward

Tanya’s Statistics

Miles run since January 1st: 788

Feet Climbed: 42,963ft which would mean she could have almost summited Mount Everest. Twice.

You only have to glance once at Facebook, Instagram or Twitter to witness it. Friends posting self congratulatory updates on their current running achievements. It could be a smug sunrise picture of their morning run (#blessed), or a new PB announcement, it might well be a jubilant race picture with a medal included to boot. Meet any runner and you will find we are nearly all guilty of it. But how many of us post updates of our bad runs or confess to those times when we feel rubbish compared to someone else?

I am now 6 months in to my Fitbitch Runnual Challenge, where I am taking the challenge to run run every day for the year, and it’s starting to feel tough. Runs that felt new and fun 6 months ago, are now feeling too familiar. I’m like a (marginally) less hairy Forrest Gump without the entourage, running through the streets of Brighton, friends beeping their cars when they see me or waving manically across the street at my red, sweaty face.

On Strava (join the Fitbitch Run Club on Strava here), my trophies are getting less frequent where my efforts have plateaued, and I’m finding distance a struggle now I don’t have a marathon to train for. But…running daily is giving me some insight into understanding my body and the reasons why I can have a bad run.

 

So next time you give up and go home thinking, ‘Oh I’m just rubbish,’ think about the factors that could be contributing to a bad run and just keep on running through it.

Zombie Running

This month I took part in the Mizuno Endure 24 race, a 24 hour relay race where the Fitbitch team of 8 took turns to run a 5 mile loop run continually over 24 hours. During the  event, my endorphins kicked in, and the excitement of running through the night and talking to new people on route meant I felt amazing. But, oh, the following week I felt like an old lady running through treacle. (I had another tough tired run this month in Paris, following a 3am start and miles of walking through beautiful streets and schmoozing with celebrities, but something tells me I won’t getting sympathy for this one!)

Temporary sleep deprivation gives runners the perceived notion that their efforts are higher because the brain and nervous system are sluggish, even though your heart, legs and lungs should be working okay. In this situation, coffee is your friend, as are little mind games – Sending “breath to my legs” while running in an attempt to ‘lighten’ them, the promise of a 3 minute post shower lie down at the end of my run, or a cold drink helps me to keep my focus positive. Understanding that my feelings of exhaustion will soon pass once my sleep patterns have regulated helped me to keep going, and not give up.

Star jumps in Paris

Star jumps in Paris

 

Menstrual Cycle

OMG, If I had attempted to take up running the week before my period was due, there is a good chance I wouldn’t be writing this blog and I’d be an entirely different person – maybe a slightly chubbier one with less smug Facebook updates. When I’m hormonal, it appears to make me breathless and it occurs in the second half of my cycle. For around 4 days, you could be mistaken for thinking I smoke 40 Marlboro a day.

Running hills feels totally unachievable & I scare the living daylights out of anyone that I happen to be running past with my heavy breathing. Throw in sore boobs, achy abdomen, back ache, hot flushes, tears and dehydration and you would be forgiven for thinking I’m a sneeze away from a full week’s bedrest. If I wasn’t so in tune with my cycle and how it affects my runs, I would assume my body was unable to sustain a run and give up altogether!

Mental strength is my friend on these days, and if I have to walk a hill, so be it. Positive visualisations, mantras, listening to music, distracting myself thinking of my ‘To Do’ list, or what the hell I’m going to do with those three dirty beetroot and the two cabbages I got in my veg box – ANYTHING. I know its just my hormones playing unkind games, and that the act of running actually helps with most PMT symptoms. It’s worth downloading an app – such as Clue – to monitor your cycle so you are aware of your symptoms as and when they happen.

Focusing on cooking - or eating - to get me through my run

Focusing on cooking – or eating – to get me through my run

Running on empty

There are a lot of things that I have to juggle with four (very social and active) children and a cycling mad husband who also works 60 hours a week. My children eat  well planned, nutritious and beautifully presented meals, my husband eats a protein based diet, and I eat a Vegan based diet. Yeah, I know right, rod for my own back.Often, my needs come last and my vegan dinner can sometimes be some hummus on rye crackers and some (unpeeled) raw carrots. When I try running the day after after a dismal dinner, the effects are noticeable, no energy and running feels impossible.

The key, I’ve learned, is to plan meals with your runs in mind, I cannot afford to conk out halfway through a long run simply because I haven’t fuelled my body properly the day before. I have started making dinners in batches and freezing them for last minute panic meals. I use a Vegan protein shake by Sunwarrior, which I blend with almond milk and a banana for post run fuelling and I try to drink two litres of water a day.

She-wolf tendencies?

Before you roll your eyes,and assume I’ve gone bonkers, I really think the days leading up to a full moon make my legs heavy, as if they have a magnetic force pulling them down to the ground…I’d be interested to hear if anyone else ever gets this?

 

EVERYONE has bad runs. I have run with enough people over the last six years to be able to assure you of this. It doesn’t mean you are necessarily unfit, or useless, or ‘can’t run’, It might just mean you need to analyse WHY you are having a tough day running, accept it, carry on and think of ways to counteract it for next time. Let go of your ego, and try not to compare your run to anyone else’s. Everyone is different, everyone is going through different things. Everyone’s body copes in different ways. One thing I can promise you though, is any run is better than no run. Cross my heart. Anyway, I’m off to plan some new running route and maybe enter a few races and book onto Fitbitch Trackstars, to basically shake things up a bit. “A change is as good as a rest” after all, and I’ve still got another 6 months of running to go!

Taking part in a 24 hour relay - easier than running on my own!

Taking part in a 24 hour relay – easier than running on my own!

Tanya’s Top Tracks for Running Uplift

  1. ‘Pump it Up’ – Elvis Costello
  2. ‘I Feel Love’ (12”) – Donna Summer
  3. ‘Can I Get A…’ – Jay Z (feat Amil)
  4. ‘Just Can’t Get Enough’ – Depeche Mode
  5. ‘Working on the Highway’ – Bruce Sprinsteen


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