Posts Tagged ‘training’

GRTW Get Together Race, Brighton Half Marathon

February 25, 2018 at 8:15
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Join us at our Girls Run the World Get Together Events at the Brighton Half marathon in 2018. You’ll need to enter the race yourself but come and meet us at Yellowave for the warm up and send off to the start line. We’ll be there to cheer you in at the end too.

Meet at 8.35am at Yellowave, after you’ve dropped your bags off which will give you plenty of time for a warm up and to get to your pens. It’s a busy race.



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GRTW Get Together Race, Maverick Original Sussex

February 24, 2018 at 7:30
Posted by Rachael Woolston

To help inspire and bring the women of GRTW from the UK together, we’ve created a series of get together events some with our race partners who have provided exclusive discounts to GRTW community.

This is one of them, a beautiful off-road run in West Sussex offering a variety of distances to suit everyone. if you want to read about the maverick races, you can read our blog about their Kent race, form one of our runners, Sarah Crosier. http://girlsruntheworld.co.uk/2017/10/13/race-review-the-maverick-inov-8-original-kent/.

We will meet at the race for a warm up and the post run celebration. Wear your GRTW t-shirts to help identify yourself.

For the 15% discount, you must be subscribed to our community which you can do via our website. There is a team Girls Run the World on the entry when you enter so search for us as a team.



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GRTW Run Like a Pro Workshop Series, Heart Rate Training

February 3, 2018 at 8:00
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Many of us may have even received a free heart rate monitor when we bought our training watch but may never have used it. Now is your chance to find out how to use heart rate training to supplement your run training.

In this workshop, you’ll find out what your own personal heart rate training zones are, and why working within certain target zones can help ensure you are training correctly, which can mean training hard enough when doing a pace session to get the most out of it, or conversely, when your heart rate is showing you are ill or  under stress and shouldn’t run. 

You will need to bring your own heart rate monitor, already paired to your watch. You can finish the workshop by putting into practise what you’ve learned at our GRTW Get Together Hove Prom Parkrun.

 £4.99 Facebook Live.



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GRTW Run Like a Pro Workshop Series: The Runners Mind

January 10, 2018 at 8:00
Posted by Rachael Woolston

The first of our Facebook Live workshops, we will be chatting with mum of two and former professional triathlete Katherine O’Hara. An accredited life coach and personal trainer, Katherine has completed five Ironmans and has represented GB, recently winning the her age group European Duathlon Champs in May in 2017.  

Like many women, she only started a sporting life in her late twenties and understands exactly what it is like juggling multiple tasks. She is also uniquely placed to help you grasp the tips, tricks and strategies for getting over mental obstacles in your training or race, whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned runner heading for your first or fifth marathon.

This workshop, can be taken as a live event where you will get the opportunity to ask Katherine questions direct or replay it whenever you like. You’ll leave equipped with strategies to help you train and to race.



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GRTW Autumn-Winter Season 2017-18

September 10, 2017 at 8:30
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Enjoy beautiful running locations, off-road and one, with our qualified running coaches during our Autumn-Winter series this year. Whatever your goal, to build your fitness, find new people to run with, get faster, run longer or train for an event, we’ll help you reach your goal.

GIRLS RUN THE WORLD AUTUMN – WINTER SUNDAY TRAINING ROUTES AND MEET UP LOCATION INFORMATION CLICK HERE

There will be 17 runs in the series (click the link below to download locations and mileage per week) which will focus on building endurance and running fitness.

The Autumn Series will focus on building strength and stamina for the Mince Pie 10 mile trail race, December 10th as well as building your base fitness for half marathons.

The Winter Series, starting 26th November (from this date there will be two distances on offer per run) will get you ready for the Brighton Half Marathon. Of course, there are lots of fantastic off-road and road races along the way that our training will get you prepared for – the Eastbourne Half Marathon, Tunbridge Wells Half Marathon, Downland Devil, Moleyman and many more.

No one gets left behind, and the faster runners don’t stand still. This is our ninth season of helping women to build endurance so we know how to keep you motivated, moving and getting stronger on each run.

Our season pass works out at just £4 per run, so you can enjoy the best of both worlds – running with us for your training, as well as taking part in races and events with the women you meet on our runs.

There are various payment options:

  • Autumn-Winter Series runs September 10th – February 18th – £68 (£4 per run)
  • Autumn Series runs September 10th – December 10th – £45 (£5 per run)
  • Winter Series runs November 26th – February 18th – £50 (£5)
  • OR drop in single sessions, £10

 

We will not have sessions on some dates and hope that you will instead join us for a GRTW meet up at these events. These include:

October 8th Rise UK 8km

October 15th, Bright10

November 19th, Brighton 10km

December 10th, Mince Pie 10 miles

December 24/31st – Christmas

 

GIRLS RUN THE WORLD AUTUMN – WINTER SUNDAY TRAINING INFORMATION CLICK HERE

Here’s what they said about our Summer 2017 series

‘I have had the best ever summer of running with an amazing and supportive group of women.  Despite my slower pace I always knew the coach or other runners would wait  for me to catch up. My running has improved no end and I am more confident that I can run further than ever before , with 8.5 miles now my longest including the hills. I so much enjoyed the varied routes and have taken to the running some favourites on other days.’

Kelly Cahill

 

 



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Improve to 10km

October 18, 2016 at 9:30
Posted by Rachael Woolston

If you can already run 5km and would love to build your distance, this is the course for  you. A five week course accompanied by our training plan will help you to build gradually with lots of technique advice and within a group of like-minded women.

Download your training plan here

Please note, the first two weeks are 45 minutes, the remaining three are one hour.



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How to train smart for Brighton Half or a Marathon

October 14, 2016 at 5:11
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Does your training largely consist of downloading a training plan off an event site and vaguely following it just to get up to distance? Take the stress out of training and achieve better results by training smarter and thinking about it NOW

Train smart for endurance

Train smart for endurance

First off, there is nothing inherently wrong with doing the above if that’s all you can fit in, but if you really want to achieve your goal – even if that is to just reach the end smiling, then putting some thought into your training and doing it now BEFORE you start even thinking about adding running miles is essential.

Your training should include cycles, a macro, micro and mesocycles – this sounds more complicated than it is but as an essential start point, think about your overall goal – I want to run a marathon in April and get sub 4 hours/do it without getting injured/run it on 3 training sessions per week. Whatever it is, having the goal allows you then to work backwards and plan in your training to get you to that point, including putting in the races that will help you to reach that target and more importantly the FOUNDATION work that you need to put in now to build your strength.

It will also help you to take into account the changing nature of your training; it’s all very well having a set plan (which is better than not having one!) but injury, illness, busy work times all mean that you need to adapt your mesocycles to accommodate this rather than giving up on your plan entirely and winging it. Over the last eight years we’ve trained women to half marathon and marathon levels, this is where you see most people going wrong – wing it and you’ll end up with a broken wing!

Confused by all of this? To make it easy for you, right now (if doing a half marathon in Feb or a marathon in Spring) you should be entering your base training period, which means building the strength and stability, addressing any imbalances and working on your core.

We’ve created a RunStrong weekly class to help address this for more experienced runners while our Autumn Burn four week course which starts Monday 17th on Hove Lawns and Queen’s Park (and Worthing for two weeks) is aimed at total beginners who have not done much running and just need to wake up their muscles to get them working while getting to the headspace of thinking about regular training.

If you are an experienced marathon runner though and aiming for a specific race target, you may want to try our marathon mentoring service with run coach, Tara, a sub 3 hour 20 min marathon runner who lives and breathes the sport and can help you one to one, writing a plan every four to six weeks tailored specifically to where you are/how you have progressed.

If you are interested in any of these things, get in touch or book online. Happy Running!

 

 

 



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Race Review: Beat the Tide 10km

August 12, 2016 at 5:18
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Fancy a race that uses nature to give the event a clever twist? Fitbitch runner, Andrea Childs reports on a 10km where you battle the incoming tide for the finish line…

Sandy sprints

Sandy sprints

 

A total of six Fitbitches travelled to Worthing for this year’s Beat the Tide, an annual 10k race organised by Sussex Trail Events (www.sussextrailevents.com). It’s a one-of-a-kind event for anyone who knows the pebbly beaches of the South Coast. At this time of the year, the tide goes out far enough to reveal some rarely seen sand, a wide enough strip to run along and indulge your wildest Baywatch Babe fantasies. Unfortunately, having arrived late for the 7pm start, the Fitbitch crew were less Pamela Anderson, looking California tanned in an orange swimsuit; more sweaty, stressed Brightonians in our trademark purple running tops.

It had all started so well. Facebook race page posted in the Fitbitch runners group (we have these for all events, to help keep track of which Fitbitches are taking part which helps motivate you to get involved too – you can join HERE). Lifts organised (that’s the beauty of running as part of a community; there’s always someone to share a ride with). Sun shining (okay, we didn’t organise that bit, but it’s always a good omen for a race). And then we set out for the roughly 14-mile drive along the coast from Brighton to Worthing.

The journey usually takes around 35 minutes. On that evening, a combination of rush-hour congestion and a traffic accident meant that despite setting off before 6pm, one car arrived at 7.05pm and the other at 7.25pm. Fortunately for the first car, the organisers had realised the traffic was a problem and had delayed the start by a few minutes, meaning that at least two of us began the race on time. When they finally arrived, the remaining four Fitbitches were warmly welcomed and allowed to start the race half an hour late, following the footprints in the sand left by the other Beat the Tide runners. The organisers even called the marshalls along the course to let them know they were coming. Fortunately, they managed to catch up with the tail-enders before too long.

The race itself couldn’t have been better – a straight dash along the beach and then coastal path from Worthing to Widewater Lagoon in Shoreham, and back again, with only a short sandy beach sprint to join the two sections. Along the way, children cheered from the groynes, kite surfers skitted along the surf and marshalls handed out drinks (there were two stations) and jelly sweets. The atmosphere was fun and friendly, with lots of local club runners taking part, plus a couple dressed (I think) as Peter Pan and Tinkerbell. And because, as the race marketing says, we were ‘racing against nature’ – the incoming tide – there was a cutoff of two and a half hours for participants, although none of us found ourselves paddling to the finish. One of the Fitbitches placed third woman. And as our last runner approached the line, the sun setting behind her, the rest of the crew ran down to support her over the last few metres as she finished her first 10k race and was handed her medal (there was one for every finisher). We’ll definitely be back next year. We’ll just leave longer to get there next time.

Being part of a running community helps keep you motivated and inspired - plus there's always someone to share a post race celebratory cocktail

Being part of a running community helps keep you motivated and inspired – plus there’s always someone to share a post race celebratory cocktail

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Review in Brief: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

The good

A chance to shun the pebbles and run along a sandy beach. Fantastic welcome from the race organisers, despite our late arrival.

The bad

The headwind was great for kitesurfers but not so much for runners. And be aware that there are no toilets provided.

The ugly

The traffic. Maybe we can cycle to the start next year?

If you would like to join our running community, sign up for our newsletter for details of all our Autumn Winter courses, as well as community races and Girls Run the World trips to races around the world.

 

 



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The Diary of a Running Mum

June 9, 2016 at 12:11
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Juggling four kids and a workaholic husband, Tanya Taylor, 43, also decided to take on the challenge of running every day of 2016. Here’s the first of her despatches about life on the run…

 

Tanya at the London Marathon

Tanya at the London Marathon

I’ve just completed my 156th run in 156 days. Sometimes they are long and ploddingly slow and other times they are fast and challenging, leaving me bright red and dripping with sweat. I’ve run in the sun, rain, wind and even in snow when forecasters were warning people not to go outdoors. From New York to Paris, Berlin to London and all over East Sussex, my feet have taken me a long way this year. And I have got another 210 days to go in my bid to run every day of 2016.

Runnual, is part of the Fitbitch challenge community, a list of challenges throughout the year which anyone can follow to help you have goals and keep you motivated.  Some are easy, a park run, others are about adventure, such as a the 24 hour Endure Relay Race and then there are those about consistency, such as swimming every day in July. But other than the Fitbitch founder, Rachael, I am the only one who committed to  RUNNUAL, running every day throughout 2016.

So, why am I doing it, everyone asks? I liked the idea of having a focus and commitment to my training that was simple to follow. Not that I didn’t have my doubts about doing it; what if I got injured, could I fit it in every day? But most of all, I was worried about failing. What if I started and couldn’t actually do it?

I knew the only way I was going to be able to commit and make this work was to make some rules.

Tanya’s Five Run Commandments

  1. No matter what the weather, I have to run outside. I wanted to get the benefit of fresh air and observe the changing seasons not a gym changing room.
  2. I have to wear proper running kit and trainers. No dash to the car with my handbag allowed to be classed as a run.
  3. I have to be kind to myself. If I had a crappy run, I was determined not to beat myself up about it but to just let it go.
  4. I had to run at least one mile, no less, for it count.
  5. I had to record it on Strava. For me, this was a way to keep track of my runs like a virtual diary.

Run number 1 of 366 on New Year’s Day didn’t feel so unusual. For the last 4 years I have run on New Years with my friend E. We run along Brighton & Hove seafront, past the all-night revellers, and discuss our hopes for the forthcoming year. There is something cleansing and empowering about our ritual and it’s always one of my favourite runs of the year.

Fast forward to now and I’m almost six months through my runnual year. It has been both amazing and at times very hard. There have been runs where I’ve seen the sun rise above the sea or set over the Sussex hills. Some have been in pouring rain, into 70mph winds or under baking hot sun. I’ve enjoyed runs where I’ve laughed listening to stories from some of my fellow runners, and others where I have run alone, tears pouring down my face as I’ve worked things through in my head. Running is cathartic, eventually everything comes to the surface as surely as putting one foot in front of the other.

But have there been times when I’ve felt like giving up? Yes, on those runs were my legs felt like lead and my mind is telling me I’m useless. But just as frequently, I’ve been rewarded with runs where I have felt invincible.

Stand out runs have to be running at sunrise alone through Paris, or in Central Park, New York in a -22 degree windchill, clapping my hands above my head in an attempt to keep warm, then returning to the hotel with cheers (and relief that I survived, I suspect) from the hotel doormen. I have run on the track in Berlin’s Olympic stadium having a panic attack following a particularly gruelling 15 mile race, and had my lovely running buddy J grab my hand and tell me I was going to be okay.

Recent runs have included running at night in the woods with some of the Fitbitch running club, with just head torches and giggling for guidance through the dark while training for a 24 hour team endurance race. But the best run of the year (and maybe my life so far) was the London Marathon in April 2016.  It was my first marathon and I’d trained hard, but had spent months feeling anxious, self doubt gnawing away at me. But it was amazing, a total high from beginning to end; the crowds, the atmosphere, the views, it was brilliant. I made new friends en-route (shout out to N and L from Sheffield) who I chatted to for almost 20 miles. Both my mind and body felt strong that day, and I managed to keep a consistent pace throughout. At mile 21, there was a moment when a young woman locked eyes with me and shouted in a thick East End cockney accent; “Go on Tanya, you’ve got this, you’ve got this girl”, and that was when I knew, I had.

If you had told me eight months ago that I’d run every day, I would have said no way. I would have said, ‘I don’t have the time, I’m not fit or strong enough.’ It’s not like running comes naturally to me; my body is not a classic ‘runners body’…I’m more Fatima Whitbread than Paula Radcliffe. But if there is one thing this challenge has taught me, it is that you an achieve anything with the right focus.

Tanya’s top tips on how to incorporate regular running into you life

  • Use your run as part of your social life. It is more fun to run with company, and you can always have a cup of tea at the end.
  • Fit it into your daily tasks/routine: I run from the supermarket carpark after I’ve done my shopping or I leave half an hour earlier to pick the kids up from their friends house/clubs and do a quick run before they finish.
  • Utilise your local running group. At Fitbitch, we have a community run on Tuesday’s, a pace session on a weekday evening and usually a long run on a Sunday. That means I only have 4 runs left to plan myself.
  • Think outside of the box. I recently had a boxing lesson, then washed in the sea, applied my moisturiser and make-up on the beach and headed straight to Charleston literary festival (You can roll your eyes here…) When the talk had finished, I changed in the carpark (there was a boob flash, but hey!) and did a quick run through the countryside stumbling across an amazing teahouse in the middle of the country as I did.
  • Download the free App Strava onto your phone. It’s ridiculously addictive. Strava allows you to monitor your speed and distance, and keeps you posted on any improvements. You can also follow your friends’ training and allow them to follow yours. I recently got approached by a (friendly) guy in a carpark who follows me on Strava and congratulated me on my achievements to date. I’d never met him before.
  • S-T-R-E-T-C-H and have massages. It may seem indulgent, but it literally is the oil to your wheels.
  • Don’t take yourself too seriously. There is nothing worse than someone having a meltdown because they’ve missed getting a PB at a local Parkrun when there are people fighting much bigger personal battles.
  • If I’m having a bad run, I shift my focus. I think about my form, keeping my torso upright, my feet light, making sure my arms are not crossing in front of my body…and if things are really bad, I imagine I’m Rocky running through Philadelphia.

With any luck, I hope this post and my monthly updates will encourage a few of you to try running regularly. The beauty of running everyday is that it removes the pressure about running to mileage and shorter, consistent runs have been as equally beneficial to my fitness levels and endurance. But the main thing I’ve learnt is no matter how tired/ill/sad I feel, I always feel better after running. Always.

I look forward to keeping you posted over the year with my progress, and will also introduce music for your running playlist, let you know of any new kit I’ve sampled and new races I’ve loved. In the meantime, happy running!

Training for Endure 24 Relay

Training for Endure 24 Relay



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HiiT for Runners

April 6, 2016 at 6:30
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Find your inner athlete

Conditioning for running for men and women

£10 drop in or £80 for 10 to be used within 8 weeks of purchase

One of the most essential elements of training for any runner is strength training. If your muscles are conditioned it helps you to avoid injury, and it will help you to feel stronger and become faster.

These 30 minute sessions are high intensity and designed specifically for runners – they will even help you lose weight too.

 



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Half Marathon Pace & Preparation

January 13, 2016 at 7:00
Posted by Rachael Woolston

Join us for this seven week course suitable for ALL levels, which will help you to fine tune your race strategy, boost your confidence and help you with your running mojo as the final weeks approach.

This course will include all those sessions that are GREAT to do in a group, and challenging to do on your own, working on intervals, pace and tempo to improve your time and to boost your mental fortitude.

It costs £60 or you can combine it with our weekend package, building distance (sunday’s at 8.30am) for £105 a saving of £15 on our weekend only package.

(For details of locations and distances of weekend runs, look at the specific days for these runs).

 



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Hove Prom 10km

September 20, 2015 at 10:00
Posted by Rachael Woolston

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Join our running community in taking part in this fun, friendly – and flat – 10km along Hove seafront. And for those who wish, join us afterwards for a Fitbitch social breakfast.

Race details here

 



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Girls Run the World: Which race is on YOUR bucket list?

July 9, 2014 at 1:41
Posted by Rachael Woolston

From running through the temples of Angkor Wat in Cambodia, to the ice caps of Greenland, there are some stunning races that will get you fit while exploring the world too

Runner’s World showcase what they view are the 50 best races in the world this month, ranging from Jungle Marathons in the Amazon to the classic marathons like Athens.

None of the races that we have taken women on with our Fitbitch Runs the World business feature, but we reckon they should.

Running through the old town of Palma was like racing through a roller coaster of cobble stones, while few sights can beat the beauty of Lake Garda twinkling in the sunshine as you run around it, with Italian pastries and cakes as refreshments.

From Paris to Palma, Lisbon to Lake Garda and Berlin to our latest addition, Istanbul this November, our trips are all about exploring the world and culture through running.

Want to come on our 2015 trips? If you haven’t done so already, PRE-REGISTER your interest here.

Founder of Fitbitch and GRW, contributes to magazines including Runner’s World and has raced in Mumbai, Istanbul, Paris and many other countries. She is currently training a client for the Polar Circle Half Marathon. To read her blog about running and travelling visit www.rachaelrunstheworld.com

 



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